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Face Blind One

Chapter 1


A small piece appeared in the New York Daily News two days after the incident had occurred. It was the first mention of the event but it wouldn’t be the last. Before long, it would become one of New York City’s great unsolved cases and a mystery that would keep the police scratching their heads for years to come.


SLAYINGS AT WRITER’S HOME

Police are baffled by the scene of multiple slayings inside the townhouse owned by writer John Cozzone, located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Two men and one woman were found dead in the home. One man and the woman had been shot to death, but the other man had been stabbed. The identities of the victims are being held until further investigation is completed.
Cozzone was not one of the slain individuals. Police are searching for the writer, who had a fleeting taste of fame and success in the mid-70s as the author of two best-selling novels, The Apples of the Cosmos and The Loose Lips of Lucretia Leone. Police are still trying to discern what relationship the victims had to Cozzone, but preliminary scrutiny indicates that the townhouse was the scene of a drug deal gone bad.


A day after the story appeared, John Cozzone’s location was made known to the New York police, and this revelation only made the mystery even more puzzling.
The investigating officer was certain that someone, somewhere, knew what had taken place in that townhouse on a warm June evening at a time when most people in Manhattan were having their dinners, or watching television, or attending the theatre.
The officer was correct, more or less. Indeed, one individual did know what had occurred in John Cozzone’s home that evening, for the person in question was present when it happened. The problem was that this witness could no more accurately detail the whos or the whys of the incident than the domestic housecat that was also in the house at the time.
To do so, one would have to possess an omniscient perspective of all the personages involved, travel back in time two weeks before the incident, and start at the beginning.


Face Blind One

Face Blind Two

Raymond Benson Interview

Face Blind Reviews